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Quick question please! I haven't been able to find (or understand) a clear answer and just want to be sure.
The firing order (piston order) is 1342 , 1 being passenger side 2 being driver side.
So when the TDC mark on the crank pully is up, piston 1 is ready to be adjusted. I turn the crank pulley 90 degrees clockwise (3 o'clock position) what piston is in the tdc position now? number 3 piston? Then another 90 degrees for number 4, and a final 90 degrees (9 o'clock) for cylinder 2?

Thanks alot!
Do it the easy way. Pull the plugs, rotate the engine by hand so that the valve you are adjusting's cam is on the low part of the lobe. Do that for every valve you adjust. You don't have to know anything about firing order or TDC.

Then replace the plugs while you have them out so you are changing them at the valve adjust service interval.
 

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Hello, forum. You guys are awesome.

I just did a valve adjustment on my 2006 EX-P, 5 speed manual with 216,494 miles.

The valves had not been adjusted before. My main symptom was the engine stalling when stopping at a traffic light, if the A/C was on, and the engine had not warmed up yet. This was a *reliable* symptom. I also had a cylinder 2 misfire check engine code thrown at me at least once.

I called a few independent mechanic shops, and two absolutely told me that "valve adjustments are not done anymore, they are unnecessary". So, rather than having a shop who had never done a valve adjustment hack through this, I did it myself.

Thanks to this forum, the job went great, and it absolutely solved my problem.

In addition to the great tips already posted here, I will add a few of my own not mentioned:

1: Before you start, clean the engine and hoses as well as you can so that when you take off the valve cover, grime and dirt doesn't fall into your engine. Spend some time on this.

2: Eric the Car Guy has a YouTube video, which is pretty good, and he has a great tip on how to turn the engine by simply turning the power steering pump with a 19mm wrench.

See:
at around time 15:55-16:40.

I did this (and did not even remove the spark plugs), and it worked great.

3: If you are changing the spark plug tube seals, whatever you do, DON'T follow the advice shown in some other YouTube videos (which will remain nameless) and remove them with a pry bar from the inside! NO! This will gouge the metal on your valve cover! Instead, use this method, which I think I pioneered:

Cut about a 6" length of 3/8" or 1/2" PVC pipe. From the TOP (outside) of the valve cover, insert the PVC pipe at an angle through the spark plug tube hole to put the edge of the pipe on the edge of the seal where it meets the metal of the valve cover. Then, using a (preferably rubber) hammer, strike the PVC pipe to dislodge the seal. You probably will have to hit the seal from perhaps two or three spots around its diameter to get it loose, but it works like a charm. The PVC pipe cannot gouge the valve cover metal at all, and using a rubber hammer will insure that if the hammer strike goes bad and hits the valve cover that no damage will occur.

4: Even if you cleaned your engine before starting this job, it is probably a good idea to change the oil and filter after the valve adjustment job, since some dirt probably got in there anyway. Run the engine a bit first, so that hopefully most dirt will be grabbed by the old filter first, and/or have a chance to settle to the bottom of the oil pan. Then change oil and filter, or at least the filter.

Other tips that others have mentioned, but I will re-iterate:

A: Definitely buy the Honda valve adjustment tool. You will save at least an hour of frustration on the input valves, as there is no room to put a box-end wrench/screwdriver combo on that side when setting the valves. On the exhaust valve side, you don't have this problem, but trust me, you want this tool on the input side.

B: Definitely get a low-range torque wrench. Others have snapped off things by over-tightening.

C: Angled feeler gauges are a MUST.

D: My exhaust valves, like others, including EricTheCarGuy have mentioned, were way out of range on the tight side. I would recommend setting them to the loose side of Honda's spec. My input valves were all sort-of in spec, so I would put them in the center of Honda's range.

Thanks again to all of you.
 

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I had a ticking noise towards drivers side, & when I did the valve adjustment, I found that spark plug well real dirty & the coil pack probe real dirty. Looked like it was brown plastic, but after cleaning found it was grey. The spark plug was dirty also, apparently loose, which was causing the ticking. The intake valves were maybe .0001 too loose & most of the ex were .004 too tight. I have 137K on odo. The tube seals were stubborn, & I finally used torch to warm area around seals for about 20 seconds, which did the trick to knock out seals. Putting them back in was easy, pushing in with fingers, no tool or hammering. Thanks everyone!
 

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My turn for feedback and tips :)

First, I recommend using this PDF download page and Eric the Car Guy's video: https://hondaelementparts.com/how-to-perform-honda-element-valve-adjustment-very-detailed/

Notice the diagrams of TDC position for each cylinder to be adjusted as shown in the pdf. NOTE: I have an ARROW on my front cam sprocket. It corresponds to "DOT A" in the PDF. Just watch where it goes and you're good to go.

For the spark plugs and coil packs, I like this video better (does not disconnect the coil packs) by 2CarPros:
Spark Plug Replacement Honda Element 2003-2011

I used this equipment:

Alltrade 648827 10mm 7-1/2-Inch Jam Nut Valve Adjustment Tool for about $9
Fel-Pro VS50614R Valve Cover Gasket Set for about $22, includes valve cover gasket, new metal/rubber grommet hold down set, new coil pack grommet seals (2 sets, one is too small. Mine used the angled/tapered/larger hole version)

Tappet Gauge With 12 Offset Tip Blades. Decimal & Metric Sizes .008,010,012,013,014 ETC. Part # W130C for about $6.50

Permatex ultra-grey. Walmart replacement for Hondabond. 4 dabs in corners (look for old dabs from original install). Let sit for 30 mins before starting.

I already had 4 Honda Iridium spark plugs on hand. They REALLY needed changed. Eroded ground, burnt porcelain.

Opinions of the equipment:

1. Cheap Jam Nut Valve Adjustment Tool. Got it done, probably would do 2-3 cars. Be VERY careful to keep it in line with the jam nut. The folding arm doesn't seem like it would last long, but very pleased to save the money and still have life in it.

2. Fel-Pro gasket kit. A+++ One of the BEST FITTING gaskets I've used to date on a number of vehicles. Start with the curved side by lining up the tab marks and each of the corners/angle points are very clearly molded into the gasket. Gasket firmly pushes into to cover's groove. No stretching required or noticed.

3. Honda plugs. Perfect. Found them on Ebay a while back for cheap price.

4. Tappet gauges. No problem. Had to bend for my application, but was able to remove from the holder and use each individually. Even able to store back in plastic card.

Tips:

First, take PICS before and at each stage of teardown. You might THINK you'll remember where the stud vs bolts go for the coil packs (hint: studs on 2&4). The bolts are the 2 longer normal bolts. The 2 shorter ones are for attaching brackets to right side of valve cover. You're welcome.

201468


Removing valve cover:

1. Rubber mallet and pry bar. Tap cover a little with rubber mallet to break gasket hard seal.

2. Use pry bar at timing cover/valve cover interface. Nice notch. Be gentle, work it a little.

3. Next pry bar spot on driver's side, pick a good spot and pry/twist it in a little bit.

4. Insert pry bar in one spot, grab back of valve cover and roll it forwards a little. This will apply 'almost straight up' pressure on back of cover. Repeat on other side. Be careful not to mar the aluminum surface.

Removing the grommet/seals for the coil packs:

1. Realize the grommet is a rubber covered METAL RING that fits inside the hole, looking from the bottom. Valve cover's structure is about 1/16".

2. Laid valve cover upside down on workbench on top of towel (cushion)

3. Edge of chisel to bend the metal inward, catching just inside the 1/16" ring. As soon as it folds in enough to grab with straight pliers, do so and twist/fold it to remove. The ring folds into "C" shape and easily removes cleanly.

4. After cleaning valve cover thoroughly, then with dawn/water and blowing dry with air hose.... Prepare new grommet/seal by sticking finger through hole of new grommet, dipping in new jug of oil, drip oil onto valve cover insert surfaces for the grommet. All should be thoroughly oiled. Hook finger so you don't drop the seal in the jug!

5. Push seal into place just a bit. Make sure it is STRAIGHT and the all edges are started.

6. Large flat washer over the seal, smack with rubber mallet. Check for seating. Repeat as necessary, don't bend anything. It is in place when the edges of the seal and valve cover are flush. Be sure to put it in straight.

7. Right before installing, Lube these seals again with oil, also the OUTER SURFACE of each pipe sticking up over the spark plug holes. No tearing allowed.


Adjusting valves:

LET UP on tool when checking valve clearances. Sounds simple, but if you happen to lean over the engine, it only takes the slightest bit of pressure to push down on the valve adjustment and get a bad (too tight) adjustment.

BENDING tappet gauges. Yep, the bend left too much interference when trying to check the valve clearances, so I wrapped the end of the gauge in a rag to protect it from marks or scrapes and bent it to be about 2/3 the length.

SLIDE TAPPET GAUGES without binding. It takes some tricky positioning to get the gauge to slide back and forth without binding. Make sure it isn't angled or your measurement will be WRONG. Bend the gauge to fit the space by covering with a rag and bending with non-aggressive-toothed-jaw pliers.

201470


Installing valve cover:

When installing, get it all lined up and look in each of the coil pack tube holes. Use your finger to align them and flex the new seal to ensure they are all started. A little on each one, then push down on each seal to be flush with the top of each pipe. The valve cover should move into place nicely.

If you oiled each tube as mentioned above, and have your grey permatex in place, the valve cover should simply push easily into place over each fastener/stud and you can start the CORRECT ACORN NUTS (see below tip).

Tighten in order shown in PDF mentioned. I started by HAND tightening each with the extension and deep well, repeated, then a bit with ratchet all around, then a bit more, repeat until tight and go back around until each is firmly seated and tightened.

Reinstalling acorn nuts:

1. There are TWO DIFFERENT STYLES OF ACORN NUTS!!!!

2. The ones with threads that start immediately are used over the new metal/rubber grommets to tighten down the valve cover (see the pdf mentioned above for tightening order). The ones with a gap before the threads start are for the plastic covers. Now you can get them started to properly tighten the valve cover. You're welcome.

Pic of valve cover studs/fasteners:

201469


I had a helper move/hold the driver's side parts out of the way when removing/installing the valve cover. Also to hold the little hose forward in the front while adjusting the valves.

I think that's it for things I didn't find in the documentation. Hope it helps others' jobs go a little smoother.
 

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My turn for feedback and tips :)

First, I recommend using this PDF download page and Eric the Car Guy's video: https://hondaelementparts.com/how-to-perform-honda-element-valve-adjustment-very-detailed/

Notice the diagrams of TDC position for each cylinder to be adjusted as shown in the pdf. NOTE: I have an ARROW on my front cam sprocket. It corresponds to "DOT A" in the PDF. Just watch where it goes and you're good to go.

For the spark plugs and coil packs, I like this video better (does not disconnect the coil packs) by 2CarPros:
Spark Plug Replacement Honda Element 2003-2011

I used this equipment:

Alltrade 648827 10mm 7-1/2-Inch Jam Nut Valve Adjustment Tool for about $9
Fel-Pro VS50614R Valve Cover Gasket Set for about $22, includes valve cover gasket, new metal/rubber grommet hold down set, new coil pack grommet seals (2 sets, one is too small. Mine used the angled/tapered/larger hole version)

Tappet Gauge With 12 Offset Tip Blades. Decimal & Metric Sizes .008,010,012,013,014 ETC. Part # W130C for about $6.50

Permatex ultra-grey. Walmart replacement for Hondabond. 4 dabs in corners (look for old dabs from original install). Let sit for 30 mins before starting.

I already had 4 Honda Iridium spark plugs on hand. They REALLY needed changed. Eroded ground, burnt porcelain.

Opinions of the equipment:

1. Cheap Jam Nut Valve Adjustment Tool. Got it done, probably would do 2-3 cars. Be VERY careful to keep it in line with the jam nut. The folding arm doesn't seem like it would last long, but very pleased to save the money and still have life in it.

2. Fel-Pro gasket kit. A+++ One of the BEST FITTING gaskets I've used to date on a number of vehicles. Start with the curved side by lining up the tab marks and each of the corners/angle points are very clearly molded into the gasket. Gasket firmly pushes into to cover's groove. No stretching required or noticed.

3. Honda plugs. Perfect. Found them on Ebay a while back for cheap price.

4. Tappet gauges. No problem. Had to bend for my application, but was able to remove from the holder and use each individually. Even able to store back in plastic card.

Tips:

First, take PICS before and at each stage of teardown. You might THINK you'll remember where the stud vs bolts go for the coil packs (hint: studs on 2&4). The bolts are the 2 longer normal bolts. The 2 shorter ones are for attaching brackets to right side of valve cover. You're welcome.

View attachment 201468

Removing valve cover:

1. Rubber mallet and pry bar. Tap cover a little with rubber mallet to break gasket hard seal.

2. Use pry bar at timing cover/valve cover interface. Nice notch. Be gentle, work it a little.

3. Next pry bar spot on driver's side, pick a good spot and pry/twist it in a little bit.

4. Insert pry bar in one spot, grab back of valve cover and roll it forwards a little. This will apply 'almost straight up' pressure on back of cover. Repeat on other side. Be careful not to mar the aluminum surface.

Removing the grommet/seals for the coil packs:

1. Realize the grommet is a rubber covered METAL RING that fits inside the hole, looking from the bottom. Valve cover's structure is about 1/16".

2. Laid valve cover upside down on workbench on top of towel (cushion)

3. Edge of chisel to bend the metal inward, catching just inside the 1/16" ring. As soon as it folds in enough to grab with straight pliers, do so and twist/fold it to remove. The ring folds into "C" shape and easily removes cleanly.

4. After cleaning valve cover thoroughly, then with dawn/water and blowing dry with air hose.... Prepare new grommet/seal by sticking finger through hole of new grommet, dipping in new jug of oil, drip oil onto valve cover insert surfaces for the grommet. All should be thoroughly oiled. Hook finger so you don't drop the seal in the jug!

5. Push seal into place just a bit. Make sure it is STRAIGHT and the all edges are started.

6. Large flat washer over the seal, smack with rubber mallet. Check for seating. Repeat as necessary, don't bend anything. It is in place when the edges of the seal and valve cover are flush. Be sure to put it in straight.

7. Right before installing, Lube these seals again with oil, also the OUTER SURFACE of each pipe sticking up over the spark plug holes. No tearing allowed.


Adjusting valves:

LET UP on tool when checking valve clearances. Sounds simple, but if you happen to lean over the engine, it only takes the slightest bit of pressure to push down on the valve adjustment and get a bad (too tight) adjustment.

BENDING tappet gauges. Yep, the bend left too much interference when trying to check the valve clearances, so I wrapped the end of the gauge in a rag to protect it from marks or scrapes and bent it to be about 2/3 the length.

SLIDE TAPPET GAUGES without binding. It takes some tricky positioning to get the gauge to slide back and forth without binding. Make sure it isn't angled or your measurement will be WRONG. Bend the gauge to fit the space by covering with a rag and bending with non-aggressive-toothed-jaw pliers.

View attachment 201470

Installing valve cover:

When installing, get it all lined up and look in each of the coil pack tube holes. Use your finger to align them and flex the new seal to ensure they are all started. A little on each one, then push down on each seal to be flush with the top of each pipe. The valve cover should move into place nicely.

If you oiled each tube as mentioned above, and have your grey permatex in place, the valve cover should simply push easily into place over each fastener/stud and you can start the CORRECT ACORN NUTS (see below tip).

Tighten in order shown in PDF mentioned. I started by HAND tightening each with the extension and deep well, repeated, then a bit with ratchet all around, then a bit more, repeat until tight and go back around until each is firmly seated and tightened.

Reinstalling acorn nuts:

1. There are TWO DIFFERENT STYLES OF ACORN NUTS!!!!

2. The ones with threads that start immediately are used over the new metal/rubber grommets to tighten down the valve cover (see the pdf mentioned above for tightening order). The ones with a gap before the threads start are for the plastic covers. Now you can get them started to properly tighten the valve cover. You're welcome.

Pic of valve cover studs/fasteners:

View attachment 201469

I had a helper move/hold the driver's side parts out of the way when removing/installing the valve cover. Also to hold the little hose forward in the front while adjusting the valves.

I think that's it for things I didn't find in the documentation. Hope it helps others' jobs go a little smoother.
I've done this job a couple of times - you did really well here.
 

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I've done this job a couple of times - you did really well here.
Thanks! I tried to include things I noted as, "It would have helped to know that," to build on the good info already shared by others.

I know I appreciate reading others' experiences and tips before I tackle each new task for the first time.
 

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Did this today at 104.5K miles. Took about 3 hours, exhausts were all on the tight side, only a couple of the intakes needed adjustment. I used the power steering bolt to turn over the engine, that saves a lot of back and forth (after I fought with it for a few minutes and realized I had the MT in Reverse). Lots of things in the way / limited access to all but maybe cylinder 1. The marks on the rear cam gear are not clear like shown in the manual, mine had some factory paint marks on it, I guess to try and highlight it. I used the firing order TDC, but you can also do it like the youtube video and look at the cam lobe, I just found it easier for me to keep track doing it the firing order way.

Removing and replacing the valve cover wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. The biggest challenge is the PS hose. I left the PS hose connected place but ziptied it to the cross member which helped keep it at least mostly out of the way.

I've adjusted a lot of valves on motorcycles so I know the "feel" part but the access definitely makes it difficult to get the feeler gauge properly positioned. I find it good practice to note the slot in the adjusting bolt orientation before adjusting because unless things are really out you don't need to turn it much to make the final adjustment, I use that as a sanity check.

The special tool is needed for the intakes, but I did it the old fashioned way on the exhausts with box wrench and screwdriver - the tool didn't work well for me back there.

The hood release lever is in a very inconvenient place when leaning over to do the exhaust valves basically stabbing you in the stomach.

My valve cover inside was clean (only oil film that wiped off, nothing caked or cooked on it anywhere) - thank you Mobil1. I replaced the all the gaskets but the plug tube seals (I made sure I put oil on them and the plug tubes before reinstalling the valve cover. Actually everything was pliable - all of them could have been reused. Valve cover went on without much drama.

Started up fine, actually better, maybe due to the new plugs I put in as well at same time. No new or strange noises for now and no leaks noted. I'd agree with previous poster, change the oil sometime soon after, even being careful there will be some dirt falling into the engine.
 

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2008 Element EX AWD
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I started prepping to do this job 2 weeks ago. I've done it before on a Toyota ~1985.

I got the gaskets set, gasket maker, spark plugs, non-chlorinated brake cleaner. and since I was going to get dirty, synthetic oil, oil filter and a new serpentine belt

I knew I had the all the specialty tools but had not looked at them in a long while. Big mistake. My feeler gauge had been oiled and put back into its original box in my metal toolbox, which was on the top shelf in my basement. with an anti-corrosion block in it. All the other tools looked great , but apparently 35 years and 2 basement floods was too much for the Craftsman feeler gauge. The blades were all rusted together.

With my area under "social distancing" I wan;t about to go aisle shopping. So I went online to try to buy a new set. The most commonly available set was from Lisle. Every auto parts store had them in stock for curbside pickup. But the gauges in that set skipped past the ones I know I'll need - the midrange and max ones, and slappy valves are happy valves. No point in checking valve with too big and too small gauges. Its a fiddly enough job as it is.

I looked at Amazon. They had lots of listings Some of those listing actually listed the measurements that the gage could check. A lot didn't. Then I noticed that all those gauges had 4 week May-June delivery dates. EBay was no help either.

After some head scratching I searched the the name and model of one gauge that seemed it might have the measurements I needed, went to the makers site and confirmed it. Then I searched for that gauge. It never appeared in the listings, but up at the page top where the paid ads are, it said Walmart with the name, a picture, and a low low price.

I clicked that Marketplace ad. It said out of stock. Nearly ready to quit, I tried searching Walmart's site and found two gauges that were available, one week delivery. One was $8 the other $30, no specs for either. So I verified the $8 gauge's spec at the "maker's" site. It was exactly what I needed. So I ordered it. It arrived 4 days later, via USPS.

Now all I need is a slightly warmer afternoon. Tuesday looks perfect.

CTA (ctatools.com) 16 blade offset feeler gauge Model A309, China. (like most of my hand tools)
0.005"-0.020" in 0.001 increments.
$7.53+tax from jbtools
 
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2003 Honda Element Sunset Orange Pearl 2WD Automatic 135K Miles I Love It!
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I started prepping to do this job 2 weeks ago. I've done it before on a Toyota ~1985.

I got the gaskets set, gasket maker, spark plugs, non-chlorinated brake cleaner. and since I was going to get dirty, synthetic oil, oil filter and a new serpentine belt

I knew I had the all the specialty tools but had not looked at them in a long while. Big mistake. My feeler gauge had been oiled and put back into its original box in my metal toolbox, which was on the top shelf in my basement. with an anti-corrosion block in it. All the other tools looked great , but apparently 35 years and 2 basement floods was too much for the Craftsman feeler gauge. The blades were all rusted together.

With my area under "social distancing" I wan;t about to go aisle shopping. So I went online to try to buy a new set. The most commonly available set was from Lisle. Every auto parts store had them in stock for curbside pickup. But the gauges in that set skipped past the ones I know I'll need - the midrange and max ones, and slappy valves are happy valves. No point in checking valve with too big and too small gauges. Its a fiddly enough job as it is.

I looked at Amazon. They had lots of listings Some of those listing actually listed the measurements that the gage could check. A lot didn't. Then I noticed that all those gauges had 4 week May-June delivery dates. EBay was no help either.

After some head scratching I searched the the name and model of one gauge that seemed it might have the measurements I needed, went to the makers site and confirmed it. Then I searched for that gauge. It never appeared in the listings, but up at the page top where the paid ads are, it said Walmart with the name, a picture, and a low low price.

I clicked that Marketplace ad. It said out of stock. Nearly ready to quit, I tried searching Walmart's site and found two gauges that were available, one week delivery. One was $8 the other $30, no specs for either. So I verified the $8 gauge's spec at the "maker's" site. It was exactly what I needed. So I ordered it. It arrived 4 days later, via USPS.

Now all I need is a slightly warmer afternoon. Tuesday looks perfect.

CTA (ctatools.com) 16 blade offset feeler gauge Model A309, China. (like most of my hand tools)
0.005"-0.020" in 0.001 increments.
$7.53+tax from jbtools
Thanks for the info. I'm about 50% sure I'll find my feeler gauges in the same condition. It's awful humid here in FL!

Now I just need to get off my gluteus maximus and do it! :)

Let us know if your new ones work out OK.
 

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Thanks for the info. I'm about 50% sure I'll find my feeler gauges in the same condition. It's awful humid here in FL!

Now I just need to get off my gluteus maximus and do it! :)

Let us know if your new ones work out OK.
The CTA gauges worked fine. When I finish using them this time I'm going to store them immersed in synthetic oil. (The Craftsman gauges were stainless and cleanable, but their labeling was illegible. The dissimilar metals of the holder and screw plus humidity caused black oxide corrosion.)

Having the 0.001 increments let me do over/under checks of every measurement - no guessing. Only one exhaust valve and one intake valve were out of the spec ranges. The other exhausts were ar the tight end of their range, 0.001in tight. The other intakes were all right in the middle of theirs. Rather than adjust all 16, I set those two to the averages of the others of the same function. Back willing, I'll go through them again this summer, and set them all to their mid ranges.

All I needed to do to get the cover off and on easily was to wear grippy gloves, use zip ties to hold the power steering hose, ignition wiring and the vacuum lines away from it. loosen the seal with a flat screwdriver, grab the squared area behind the coil channel with both hand and lift straight up. Every in-place video made it look harder than it was for me.
 

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Before I did mine I bought a set of US made Lang feeler gages - about 2 years before I did this project. There are multiple resellers that carry them. I store them in a zip-lock bag and spray them with oil before putting them away. Hand Tools - Gauges - Blade - Page 1 - Lang Tools
 

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I started prepping to do this job 2 weeks ago. I've done it before on a Toyota ~1985.

I got the gaskets set, gasket maker, spark plugs, non-chlorinated brake cleaner. and since I was going to get dirty, synthetic oil, oil filter and a new serpentine belt

I knew I had the all the specialty tools but had not looked at them in a long while. Big mistake. My feeler gauge had been oiled and put back into its original box in my metal toolbox, which was on the top shelf in my basement. with an anti-corrosion block in it. All the other tools looked great , but apparently 35 years and 2 basement floods was too much for the Craftsman feeler gauge. The blades were all rusted together.

With my area under "social distancing" I wan;t about to go aisle shopping. So I went online to try to buy a new set. The most commonly available set was from Lisle. Every auto parts store had them in stock for curbside pickup. But the gauges in that set skipped past the ones I know I'll need - the midrange and max ones, and slappy valves are happy valves. No point in checking valve with too big and too small gauges. Its a fiddly enough job as it is.

I looked at Amazon. They had lots of listings Some of those listing actually listed the measurements that the gage could check. A lot didn't. Then I noticed that all those gauges had 4 week May-June delivery dates. EBay was no help either.

After some head scratching I searched the the name and model of one gauge that seemed it might have the measurements I needed, went to the makers site and confirmed it. Then I searched for that gauge. It never appeared in the listings, but up at the page top where the paid ads are, it said Walmart with the name, a picture, and a low low price.

I clicked that Marketplace ad. It said out of stock. Nearly ready to quit, I tried searching Walmart's site and found two gauges that were available, one week delivery. One was $8 the other $30, no specs for either. So I verified the $8 gauge's spec at the "maker's" site. It was exactly what I needed. So I ordered it. It arrived 4 days later, via USPS.

Now all I need is a slightly warmer afternoon. Tuesday looks perfect.

CTA (ctatools.com) 16 blade offset feeler gauge Model A309, China. (like most of my hand tools)
0.005"-0.020" in 0.001 increments.
$7.53+tax from jbtools
I bought these https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0198E0PZS/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

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Or, check your local Harbor Freight store...
This set has all the sizes needed (and the price is right):
Feeler Gauge, 32 Pc.
 

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I adjust my valves last week on my 2010 Element with 108000 miles . I had done them before at about 65000 even though it was running perfect. Cars are to expensive to neglect them been following the maintenance minder which seems to work out to 6000 to 7000 miles between oil changes . Been running mostly Pennzoil Platinum doesn't use any oil so that is a testament to how well these little engines are made .Here are photos of my engine looked the same as it did at 65000.
205116
205117
 

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I adjust my valves last week on my 2010 Element with 108000 miles . I had done them before at about 65000 even though it was running perfect. Cars are to expensive to neglect them been following the maintenance minder which seems to work out to 6000 to 7000 miles between oil changes . Been running mostly Pennzoil Platinum doesn't use any oil so that is a testament to how well these little engines are made .Here are photos of my engine looked the same as it did at 65000. View attachment 205116 View attachment 205117
Looking good!
 

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Just to add the the collective knowledge of this thread, I will contribute my humble observations. First, big thanks to everyone here who has helped me & others tackle this project because without this, I know would have been too scared to try it myself (especially since I only have one car too).

When my 2006 EX hit 103,500 miles, it was feeling gutless on freeway on ramps. My local mechanic did a fuel injection cleaning after my attempts with BG 44K fuel system cleaner and Seafoam spray intake treatment and gas additives did little to increase the lost of horse power. (The fuel injection cleaning did help improve some but I noticed that my car started to vibrate more at idle)

Continued to use Seafoam periodically. At 112,909 miles my car's idle would randomly die and this happed about three separate occasions. When it happened multiple times on my day off, I quickly drove over to my new local mechanic (he was closer than my older mechanic) and he ran his scan reader. "No Codes!" "Sorry, It seems to be working now but I do believe you, this does happen. Something might not have failed or broke to throw a code. I don't want to start randomly replacing parts and you still have this problem. Just drive with two feet until it finally breaks"

I asked for a quote to adjust my valves. Unfortunately, he didn't like to do valve adjustments because they are labor intensive and typically only do them after installing an engine.

At 114,200 miles, I just finished my valve adjustment on my own! My element had built up a bad vibration at idle. Now, the vibration has lessen but 1/2 to 2/3rds. The engine sounds about the same loudness but I can see the engine is not vibration as much as it was before the valve adjustment. Drove it around to buy some tools to clean the throttle body and Idle Air Control Valve and notice the improvement. The engine doesn't feel weak at idle anymore!

I found that using Bungee cords to pull back the power steering hose and the ignition harness make it much easier to left the valve cover up and out. I got an assortment of cords from Home Depot.


Next, I didn't realize that I needed to remove all six metal caps and rubber grommets before separating the valve cover from the base. I started with a putty knife but that didn't work. I didn't have a thin pry bar so I used a large tapered flat head screw driver and gently rotated it to start the separation.


All I had to do when installing the valve cover back was to go under the power steering hose first then it just went straight down without any problem. I watched Eric the car guy struggle to get his on and was relived that by bungee cords made it significantly easier.

Funny thing, when I asked my first mechanic for a quote on a valve job when I was at 80,000 mile. He said, "Is your car running poorly? Is something wrong with it?" I told him no and that I saw that at 100,000 miles the owners manual for maintenance called for a valve adjustment. He replied, "You are the only customer who has ever called my for a valve adjustment when they are not experiencing any problems. I don't want you to waste your money so I don't want to do it if your not experiencing any issues." Well first off, I believed him because he has been very good, fair priced and honest. So, I believed in what he said.

However, looking back at that incident and my current mechanic and thinking; these mechanics probably don't work on a lot of high mileage Hondas. Most cars use hydraulic valve lifters that don't require adjustment. So for them, it would be a waste of time since most new cars don't require it. But unfortunately, K series type engines do!
 

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2007 Element EX AWD AT (two!)
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Congratulations! You saved yourself some money and gained some experience. The best tool you can own is a factory service manual.
 

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Nice!
 
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