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Discussion Starter #1
Guys, I've got a set of 18" wheels that have been stored in my garage since November on a wheel rack. When I went out today to check them over they have "corrosion" on the finish of the wheels that looks to be damaging.

Trying to figure out how this happened, what it is and if I can remove it??

Can post a pic later today......peace! 8)
 

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Let me see pics, I just went through this for a customer about a month ago and ended up wet sanding from 600 to 3000 grit sand paper and buffing after that, took about 7 hours for 4 wheels, it's a lot of work if it's deep. When you store wheels, even on a rack, they need to be covered with a moisture removing canister underneath the cover, it's the best way to store them. Hopefully it's not to bad.
Later
Steve
 

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By any chance is your garage unheated? If so, what you are seeing is probably aluminum oxide, caused by condensation on areas where the clear coat was scratched or chipped.

You could try dissolving it with phosphoric acid gel AKA Aluminum Jelly, but at best it'll leave pits where the oxide was.

This is a common problem. Call around to the custom wheel shops in your area (Wheel Refinishing in the Yellow Pages or http://www.google.com/search?q=wheel+refinishing+Indianapolis&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a). They will be able to do a better than you could.

The 3 ways to avoid this from recurring are to:
- store the wheels in a heated space, or
- pack them in a sealed containers with gel packs, or
- maintain an unbroken protective finish.

Check out cosmoline: http://www.cosmolinedirect.com/
It's intended for protecting metal parts stored in adverse conditions. The only drawback is that you may need to use a solvent like CosmoNot to remove the clear film.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes the garage is not heated so you deduction is probably correct...although both wheels are very well maintained w/o any blemishes on them.

I will have to look into a solution for storing them in the future....

does this only affect chrome wheels or any type wheel stored?
 

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Agreed with pss, the 18's are bad, once that clear cracks, it does not stop, they will either have to be stripped or blasted and refinished. Even if you sand them and paint over them, the paint will crack with the clear. My wife's impala wheels did the same so I used the aluminum acid tanks at work that strips anything off of aluminum and then powder coated them metallic charcoal, looks great.

As for your 22's, I'm not good on chrome repair, I've always been told once chrome pits the wheels are junk because it costs more to fix them than a new set, I am just going off what I've heard, never been into chrome so I have never had to repair them.


Also, any wheel is subject to moisture damage, they need to stay clean and dry when stored.
 

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I store the autocross wheels for my Miata in heavy contractor trash bags every winter and although I am not much concerned about how my race wheels look they come out looking perfect every Spring.

Bagging is also better for the tires too.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm pretty meticulous about my wheels but the garage is new so when they were moved during storage it's possible the "settling" of the building could have attributed to it. It's was also a very odd winter where we had a lot of moisture.

Hard lesson learned but good info to have out there for others....thanks for the input guys!!
 
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